Get Carnap's Logical Syntax of Language PDF

By Pierre Wagner

ISBN-10: 0230201512

ISBN-13: 9780230201514

This volumes objective is to supply an creation to Carnaps e-book from a old and philosophical standpoint, every one bankruptcy concentrating on one particular factor. The publication might be of curiosity not just to Carnap students yet to all these drawn to the background of analytical philosophy.

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416–18). ), Carnap defines ‘analytic in Language II’ (LSL, §34d), a concept also based on the notion of evaluation introduced in §34c. At that point, he comes so close to a definition of truth that the reader may wonder why he did not actually give one. In the special case of a logical language (Language II with no descriptive symbols), Carnap’s definition of ‘analytic in II’ is a definition of ‘true in II’. But Language I and Language II are descriptive languages (LSL, p. 101 and pp. 181–2) with synthetic sentences.

66 Formally, the concept of P-rules results from the syntactical definitions of ‘L-consequence’ and ‘P-consequence’ given in §51 (LSL, p. 181), which are the basis for further syntactical definitions (L-language, P-language, L-content, P-content . ), the most important of which is probably the definition of ‘analytic’. An analytic (or L-valid) sentence is defined as an L-consequence of the null class (whereas valid sentences are consequences 36 Carnap’s Logical Syntax of Language of the null class, and P-valid sentences are valid sentences which are not L-valid).

An analytic (or L-valid) sentence is defined as an L-consequence of the null class (whereas valid sentences are consequences 36 Carnap’s Logical Syntax of Language of the null class, and P-valid sentences are valid sentences which are not L-valid). Intuitively, the difference between P-valid and L-valid sentences is that an L-valid sentence remains valid under all possible substitutions of descriptive expressions. 68 One of the most challenging tasks of the book (from a technical point of view) is undertaken in the following paragraphs (§§53–8) where Carnap offers syntactical definitions of terms such as ‘predicate’, ‘functor’, ‘variable’, ‘sentential function’, ‘universal operator’, ‘existential operator’, ‘connective’, ‘negation’, ‘conjunction’, ‘numerical expression’, ‘numeral’, ‘arithmetic’, and ‘real number’.

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Carnap's Logical Syntax of Language by Pierre Wagner


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